The Banana Guide

Anyone who’s close to me knows I’m a little bit obsessed with bananas. I have at least one a day and loooove anything that’s got banana in it. Think banana loaf, banana cake, banana ice cream, banana muffins – anything!

I thought it would be a great idea to make a banana guide, showcasing all the different ripenesses of bananas. The print is perfect for popping in your kitchen or if you like bananas like me, just anywhere in your home!

This post is going to be about the benefits of different ripeness of bananas, as after all everyone has their own favourite banana!

Under ripe banana.

Both green and yellow bananas have the same amount of nutrients, there’s high amounts of potassium, vitamin B6 and vitamin C.

Green bananas in particular are high in fiber. The resistant starch and pectin in them help you feel fuller for longer, so it’s great if you’re not going to be eating your next meal for a while but have that hunger pang!

Green bananas are also low on the GI scale, which means they’re great for controlling blood sugar and for this reason, it’s advised that they’re the best to eat for diabetics.

Cons: Green bananas can cause digestive problems and it’s advised they’re particularly sensitive for those with a latex allergy – so be warned.

Yellow, ripe banana.

Bananas are very beneficial as they’re rich in fiber and resistant starch. This is beneficial for the bacteria in the gut and some test studies show it can help protect against colon cancer.

The potassium in bananas can help to lower blood pressure and in turn, lower the risk of heart disease. The magnesium in bananas is important for heart health too.

Yellow bananas are great for athletes. They can help to reduce muscle cramps and soreness that are related to exercise. They’re also a great source of furl for exercise itself.

Spotty bananas.

Dark spots on a banana are linked to producing a substance called TNF (Tumour Necrosis Factor), which has the ability to fight cancer cells. The antioxidants in bananas are great for annihilating free radicals that form cancerous cells.

Spotted bananas are also great for heart burn. They can help turn around the acidity in the stomach thanks to the pH of 14.

Due to the high amounts of iron and potassium that are in dark spotted bananas, hemoglobin increases which in turn strengthens the blood supply and helps the body to fight against anemia.

Spotty bananas also has high levels of tryptophan, which converts into serotonin in our bodies. Serotonin is a brain neurotransmitter which helps people feel relaxed, feel happy and improves mood.

Over ripe bananas.

The overly brown, super ripe bananas are coloured this way as they have high sugar content. This is what makes them so great for baking with. They bring a sweetness that allows you to use less refined sugar and in turn, a healthier bake.

They’re also great for baking with as the texture of the banana is quite mushy and can be used as an egg alternative, great for if you’re vegan or intolerant to eggs.

How do I like my bananas?

Overall, I love love love bananas. Although it’s very rare I eat a green banana, anything from a yellow banana onwards is ate by me and personally for me, the spotted ones are my favourite.

If a banana in our house has gone ‘too far’ and it’s super mushy and brown, it won’t go to waste. I’ll peel it and cut it up into small chunks and pop it in the freezer, they’re great for then popping into smoothies or overnight oats.

How do you like your bananas?

I’d love to know! If you’d like to get yourself one of these prints for yourself, head on over to my shop here: becca by nature.

Love, always – B
Shopify: Becca By Nature
*For prints, commissions and printables *
I also have an Etsy shop: beccabynature

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A dog mom. A plant based babe. A big dreamer.

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